Java Overriding

Java method overriding is a feature that allows a subclass to provide its own implementation of a method that is already defined in its superclass. When a method is overridden, the subclass implementation of the method is called instead of the superclass implementation.

 

To override a method in Java, the subclass method must have the same method signature (name, parameters, and return type) as the superclass method.

Here's an example of method overriding in Java:

public class BankAccount {
    private String accountNumber;
    private double balance;

    public BankAccount(String accountNumber, double balance) {
        this.accountNumber = accountNumber;
        this.balance = balance;
    }

    public String getAccountNumber() {
        return accountNumber;
    }

    public double getBalance() {
        return balance;
    }

    public void deposit(double amount) {
        balance += amount;
        System.out.println("Deposit of " + amount + " successful.");
    }

    public void withdraw(double amount) {
        if (balance >= amount) {
            balance -= amount;
            System.out.println("Withdrawal of " + amount + " successful.");
        } else {
            System.out.println("Insufficient balance.");
        }
    }

    public void displayBalance() {
        System.out.println("Account balance: " + balance);
    }
}

public class SavingsAccount extends BankAccount {
    private double interestRate;

    public SavingsAccount(String accountNumber, double balance, double interestRate) {
        super(accountNumber, balance);
        this.interestRate = interestRate;
    }

    @Override
    public void displayBalance() {
        double balanceWithInterest = getBalance() + (getBalance() * interestRate / 100);
        System.out.println("Savings account balance: " + balanceWithInterest);
    }
}

public class CheckingAccount extends BankAccount {
    private double overdraftLimit;

    public CheckingAccount(String accountNumber, double balance, double overdraftLimit) {
        super(accountNumber, balance);
        this.overdraftLimit = overdraftLimit;
    }

    @Override
    public void withdraw(double amount) {
        if (balance + overdraftLimit >= amount) {
            balance -= amount;
            System.out.println("Withdrawal of " + amount + " successful.");
        } else {
            System.out.println("Insufficient balance and overdraft limit.");
        }
    }
}

public class Main {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        BankAccount account1 = new BankAccount("001", 1000);
        account1.displayBalance(); // Output: "Account balance: 1000.0"

        SavingsAccount account2 = new SavingsAccount("002", 2000, 2.5);
        account2.displayBalance(); // Output: "Savings account balance: 2050.0"

        CheckingAccount account3 = new CheckingAccount("003", 3000, 500);
        account3.withdraw(3500); // Output: "Withdrawal of 3500.0 successful."
        account3.displayBalance(); // Output: "Account balance: -500.0"
    }
}

 

In this example, we have a BankAccount class that represents a simple bank account with an account number and balance. It has methods for depositing, withdrawing, and displaying the balance.

The SavingsAccount class extends the BankAccount class and overrides the displayBalance() method to display the account balance with the added interest rate.

The CheckingAccount class also extends the BankAccount class and overrides the withdraw() method to allow overdrafts up to the specified limit.

In the main() method, we create three different types of accounts and demonstrate their unique features through method overriding. We create a BankAccount, a SavingsAccount, and a CheckingAccount, and call their methods accordingly. The output shows how the methods are overridden and how the subclasses provide their own implementation of the methods.

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